Writing War, Wronging the Person: Representation of Human Insecurity in War Literature

Authors

  • Cecilia University of Mines and Technology, Tarkwa, Ghana.
  • Elizabeth Takoradi Technical University, Ghana.

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.17722/jell.v14i2.1160

Keywords:

war literature, trauma, rape, masculinity, heroism

Abstract

This paper presents a survey of literature written in response to wars throughout the world. The paper argues that plays, poems, memoirs and novels have been written to celebrate combatants as heroes; war literature has also been written to overcome the trauma of war while other literature has been written to underscore the effects of war and to speak out against wars. The paper also discusses the rationale for studying war literature and argues that as creative expression, literature allows us, through the imagined world of the author, to identify social trends and structures that shape the world, in particular, the factors that lead to and sustain conflict, as well as experiences of war and its long term individual and general effects.  Also, literature's aesthetic quality and its capacity to engage its audience makes it easier to transmit war time experience, and hopefully the wisdom gained from that experience, from one generation to another.

Author Biographies

Cecilia, University of Mines and Technology, Tarkwa, Ghana.

Senior Lecturer

Dept. of Technical Communication

Elizabeth, Takoradi Technical University, Ghana.

Senior Lecturer

Department of Liberal Studies

Published

2020-10-31

How to Cite

Addei, C., & Osei, C. (2020). Writing War, Wronging the Person: Representation of Human Insecurity in War Literature. Journal of English Language and Literature (ISSN: 2368-2132), 14(2), 1256-1264. https://doi.org/10.17722/jell.v14i2.1160